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Pregnancy info is everywhere. Many pregnant women feel the nesting instinct, a powerful urge to prepare their home for the baby by cleaning and decorating. As your due date draws closer, you may find yourself cleaning cupboards or washing walls — things you never would have imagined doing in your ninth month of pregnancy! But be careful not to overdo it. In the first trimester , tiredness and morning sickness can make many women feel worn out and mentally fuzzy.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Taking Care of Two: What Every Woman Needs to Know about Pregnancy

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: TIPS - 5 THINGS NOT TO SAY TO A PREGNANT WOMAN!

Pregnancy and coronavirus: information for pregnant women

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COVID, the disease caused by a new coronavirus, has rapidly spread globally and is now a pandemic, according to the World Health Organization. Many of my pregnant patients have expressed concerns, both for themselves and their babies, about the impact of COVID on their health. Together, we reviewed the extremely limited data available to provide evidence-based responses below.

Please remember, recommendations and guidelines will continue to change as we learn more about this illness. What should I do if I have a fever or cough? If I become sick, what is the risk of passing the virus on to my fetus or newborn? Should I continue to have prenatal visits? I am worried that doctors, even obstetricians, will be diverted in an emergency setting and may not be available when I am delivering.

Will that be the case? I am worried about spending time in the hospital after delivery. Current evidence suggests that the incubation period of the virus is anywhere from two to 14 days. The most important step is to practice excellent hand hygiene by frequently washing hands with soap and water for 20 seconds. Avoid touching your face, especially your eyes, mouth, and nose.

Public health officials urge people to tightly limit gatherings and to stay home as much as possible. Social distancing is important to limit the spread of the virus. Even a cloth mask, when used to cover the mouth and nose completely, helps protect you and others. If you have a mild cough or cold, stay at home and limit exposures to other people. Sneeze and cough into a tissue that you discard immediately, or into your elbow, to avoid making others sick.

Hydration and adequate rest also are important in maintaining the health of your immune system. We recommend avoiding all travel at this time, given the concerns that the virus could be widespread, and changing travel restrictions see CDC travel advisories. While a baby shower is a joyous and important occasion, public health agencies such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC recommend social distancing to limit the spread of the virus. Particularly in large gatherings, the risk of possible exposure and infection is quite high.

We recommend limiting social gatherings at this time. It is very important to limit the spread of the virus. The American College of Obstetrician and Gynecologists has provided all obstetricians with an algorithm for how to manage pregnant patients who may have symptoms of COVID or exposure to COVID, and your obstetrician may be able to help you triage your symptoms over the phone.

Given that this is a novel virus, little is known about its impact on pregnant women. At this time:. The United Kingdom declared pregnant women a vulnerable patient population. However, that statement is not based on any evidence demonstrating increased risk to pregnant women from COVID With the flu, data show pregnant women are likely to experience more serious illness than the general population.

Based on this data, some experts are advising caution and suggesting that pregnant women may be vulnerable to more serious illness if they get COVID However, this is not based on any evidence from COVID cases, but on historical data from other viral infections. Given the lack of evidence, we recommend that pregnant women continue to practice social distancing and excellent hand hygiene. If pregnant women who are health care providers are concerned about their risk of exposure to COVID, we recommend that they discuss their concerns with their supervisor.

An increased risk of miscarriage or fetal malformations has not been documented in pregnant women who are infected with COVID, according to the CDC. However, this data is extremely limited, and the infection may not be the direct cause of preterm birth. Currently, only small studies reporting on a limited number of cases are available to answer many questions, including this one. The risk of passing the infection to a fetus appears to be very low. Currently there is no evidence of any fetal malformations or effects due to maternal infection with COVID Prenatal visits are important to ensure maternal and fetal health.

However, given the current global pandemic we are facing, many obstetricians are either increasing the interval between visits or encouraging telehealth visits. We recommend that women talk to their obstetrician about their prenatal care and continue to attend appointments as long as their obstetrician feels it is appropriate. Hospitals are responsible for making contingency plans for emergencies that might require diverting hospital staff.

Ask your obstetric team about contingency plans at your hospital. They should be able to keep you updated on any change in plans. At our hospital, there is currently no plan for obstetricians to be redeployed. Ask your health care team about this. Hospital staff and your obstetric team are trying to minimize the number of people who come to the hospital. There are rules to make sure that anyone who needs to evaluated for COVID will be isolated from other patients.

In the hospital, many precautions are being taken to minimize exposure risks. If you choose to do so, it may be possible to go home sooner than you normally would after birth, as long as you feel well and your birth was uncomplicated.

Talk to your obstetric team about this. Currently, there is no evidence of the virus in breast milk. Be sure to use proper hand hygiene and cleaning of breast pump parts. However, the CDC states that handwashing and wearing a face mask should minimize risks to the infant. I delivered my baby lady Friday, March 13 via c-section. I was wondering about concerns for me due to having a surgery?

Thank you for this information! So my wife is pregnant who works from home, boris has said there could be problems to pregnant women and to self isolate, myself I work all over the UK, what should I do?? Hi can you comment on the scenario of the newborn once safely in this world contracting the virus from anyone other than the mother, and likely symptoms, health risk for newborns from COVID?

Would the absence of a strong immune system mean there may not be transition during birth but high risk right thereafter? Related Posts: Chondroitin and melanoma: How worried should you be?

10 Things That Might Surprise You About Being Pregnant

COVID, the disease caused by a new coronavirus, has rapidly spread globally and is now a pandemic, according to the World Health Organization. Many of my pregnant patients have expressed concerns, both for themselves and their babies, about the impact of COVID on their health. Together, we reviewed the extremely limited data available to provide evidence-based responses below. Please remember, recommendations and guidelines will continue to change as we learn more about this illness. What should I do if I have a fever or cough?

Advice from the UK government is rapidly changing as more is learned about the virus. We are updating this information as new guidance becomes available. We understand that many of you will be very worried and have lots of questions.

When you have found out that you are pregnant, there are a lot of things you need to know. Sometimes just knowing where to start and which information you can trust can be a challenge. On the following pages you will find out information of the various tests and scans you will need, what is safe for both you and your baby and what are the best lifestyle changes you might need to make to have a healthy pregnancy and baby. We also have information on how your baby will develop and grow over the next nine months and also some of the common issues that most women encounter during their pregnancy.

If You Are Pregnant, Breastfeeding, or Caring for Young Children

Although there are currently no data showing that COVID affects pregnant people differently than others, we do know that pregnant people are at greater risk of getting sick from other respiratory viruses than people who are not pregnant. Sometimes, this causes adverse outcomes for the mother or child. Therefore, if you are pregnant, be mindful about reducing your risk of getting sick. You can also teach your children everyday steps such as proper handwashing to stay healthy:. CDC recommends that everyone 2 years and older wear a cloth face covering that covers their nose and mouth when they are out in the community. B ecause of the danger of suffocation, do NOT put cloth face coverings on babies or children younger than 2 years. Parents and other caregivers should keep in mind that wearing a cloth face covering is not a substitute for social distancing, frequent hand washing, or other everyday preventive actions — please wear your cloth face covering in addition to practicing other prevention steps. A cloth face covering is not intended to protect you, the wearer, but it may prevent you from spreading the virus to others. Please remember that medical face masks and N95 respirators are reserved for healthcare personnel and other first responders. Learn more about cloth face coverings.

Pregnant and worried about the new coronavirus?

Congratulations, and welcome to your pregnancy! From what to expect each week to how to prepare for labor and beyond, here's the info you need. The educational health content on What To Expect is reviewed by our medical review board and team of experts to be up-to-date and in line with the latest evidence-based medical information and accepted health guidelines, including the medically reviewed What to Expect books by Heidi Murkoff. This educational content is not medical or diagnostic advice.

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The Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists has released official guidelines to outline information for pregnant women and new mums  ‎Coronavirus and trying to get · ‎8 ways to manage anxiety in.

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