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Take a girl like you kingsley amis

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A still from the film version of Take a Girl Like You. He was much in demand as a reviewer and journalist, and he could afford monthly visits to London, where he would drink from lunch until closing time. Just then a bandaged man in his underwear staggered into the room. This, Mavis told her guest, is Kingsley Amis. Geoff was his former student, and Mavis his mistress. Amis led a complicated life.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Take a girl like you (1969) - Standish discusses Jenny Bunn

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Take a Girl Like You - Kingsley Amis 2001

Take A Girl Like You

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Young Jenny Bunn comes to infant-teach outside of London and is quite determined to lose the narrow-minded ideas of her north country home. She is helped on her way by the owners of her digs, Dick and Martha Thompson, a fellow boarder, Anna le Page, assorted acquaintances and Patrick Standish, teaching in a nearby college, who resists falling seriously in love with her.

Jenny, very firm about not going to bed with anyone until marriage is in the picture, has an up and down time with Patrick, loses him to some fancy partying with the worldly Ormerod, troubles with his headmaster's daughter, and after his repeated returns to her, in a drunken moment, is raped by him. But this insures marriage so- - -This fourth novel is of lesser stuff than the others in its parade of situations, its melange of people, its unfocused line.

Those looking for the expected satire and humor will find little of either — or much else to admire. A strange, subtle, and haunting novel. A financier's Ponzi scheme unravels to disastrous effect, revealing the unexpected connections among a cast of disparate characters. How did Vincent Smith fall overboard from a container ship near the coast of Mauritania, fathoms away from her former life as Jonathan Alkaitis' pretend trophy wife?

In this long-anticipated follow-up to Station Eleven , Mandel uses Vincent's disappearance to pick through the wreckage of Alkaitis' fraudulent investment scheme, which ripples through hundreds of lives.

There's Paul, Vincent's half brother, a composer and addict in recovery; Olivia, an octogenarian painter who invested her retirement savings in Alkaitis' funds; Leon, a former consultant for a shipping company; and a chorus of office workers who enabled Alkaitis and are terrified of facing the consequences.

Slowly, Mandel reveals how her characters struggle to align their stations in life with their visions for what they could be. For Vincent, the promise of transformation comes when she's offered a stint with Alkaitis in "the kingdom of money. For Alkaitis, reality itself is too much to bear. In his jail cell, he is confronted by the ghosts of his victims and escapes into "the counterlife," a soothing alternate reality in which he avoided punishment.

It's in these dreamy sections that Mandel's ideas about guilt and responsibility, wealth and comfort, the real and the imagined, begin to cohere. At its heart, this is a ghost story in which every boundary is blurred, from the moral to the physical. How far will Alkaitis go to deny responsibility for his actions? And how quickly will his wealth corrupt the ambitions of those in proximity to it? In luminous prose, Mandel shows how easy it is to become caught in a web of unintended consequences and how disastrous it can be when such fragile bonds shatter under pressure.

John Mandel. A violent surfacing of adolescence which has little in common with Tarkington's earlier, broadly comic, Seventeen has a compulsive impact. For Holden is now being bounced from fancy prep, and, after a vicious evening with hall- and roommates, heads for New York to try to keep his latest failure from his parents.

He tries to have a wild evening all he does is pay the check , is terrorized by the hotel elevator man and his on-call whore, has a date with a girl he likes—and hates, sees his 10 year old sister, Phoebe. He also visits a sympathetic English teacher after trying on a drunken session, and when he keeps his date with Phoebe, who turns up with her suitcase to join him on his flight, he heads home to a hospital siege.

This is tender and true, and impossible, in its picture of the old hells of young boys, the lonesomeness and tentative attempts to be mature and secure, the awful block between youth and being grown-up, the fright and sickness that humans and their behavior cause the challenging, the dramatization of the big bang.

It is a sorry little worm's view of the off-beat of adult pressure, of contemporary strictures and conformity, of sentiment…. Already have an account? Log in. Trouble signing in? Retrieve credentials. Sign Up. Pub Date: Feb. Page Count: Publisher: Harcourt, Brace. No Comments Yet. More by Kingsley Amis.

New York Times Bestseller. IndieBound Bestseller. Page Count: Publisher: Knopf. Review Posted Online: Nov. Show all comments. More by Emily St. More About This Book. A strict report, worthy of sympathy. Page Count: - Publisher: Little, Brown. More by J. Please sign up to continue. Almost there! Reader Writer Industry Professional. Send me weekly book recommendations and inside scoop. Keep me logged in. Sign in using your Kirkus account Sign in Keep me logged in.

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Take A Girl Like You by Kingsley Amis (1960)

Post a Comment. He was one of the great comic novelists of the 20th Century, and also a long-time proponent of SF and a writer of a number of SF novels and short stories. In his memory, here's a review I wrote some time ago of one of his best novels. Kingsley Amis opened his career with the novel that remained his most famous work to the end of his life: Lucky Jim.

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Young Jenny Bunn comes to infant-teach outside of London and is quite determined to lose the narrow-minded ideas of her north country home. She is helped on her way by the owners of her digs, Dick and Martha Thompson, a fellow boarder, Anna le Page, assorted acquaintances and Patrick Standish, teaching in a nearby college, who resists falling seriously in love with her. Jenny, very firm about not going to bed with anyone until marriage is in the picture, has an up and down time with Patrick, loses him to some fancy partying with the worldly Ormerod, troubles with his headmaster's daughter, and after his repeated returns to her, in a drunken moment, is raped by him. But this insures marriage so- - -This fourth novel is of lesser stuff than the others in its parade of situations, its melange of people, its unfocused line. Those looking for the expected satire and humor will find little of either — or much else to admire.

TAKE A GIRL LIKE YOU

Surprisingly long at pages in the Penguin paperback edition, ie this novel has the same weight and heft as a modern literary classic, as Lawrence or Conrad or Foster, but its subject matter is unclassically slender. She finds a rented room in a house owned by an older man, auctioneer Dick Thompson and his wife, Martha, sharing along with the other boarder, the podgy French girl, Anna le Page. In the voice of Patrick, who emerges as her main suitor:. Oh lordy lordy lordy, how lovely she was, with all that thick inky-black hair and the slightly hollow cheeks and the faint blue veins at the temples and the very definite natural line surrounding the lips and the lips themselves and and and and and and. It is an Amis characteristic to have a new chapter starting immediately where the previous one left off, sometimes in mid-conversation. In sum: it tells the story straight through with few if any flashy effects. Nothing improbable or unnatural happens. Same for the chapters which follow her lead suitor, the raffish public schoolteacher, Patrick Standish, as in the quote above. Can the reader suspend their disbelief long enough to give him the chance? Jenny moves into the boarding house and starts working at her school; immediately she finds herself entangled in various ways with Patrick, Graham and Dick and the receiver of unwanted advances from the lesbian Anna; she knows she probably wants some kind of relationship but can only see it in terms of marriage ie she lets them all kiss her and grope her a little but draws a definite line and pushes them all away when that line is reached touching one breast is allowed, nothing more.

Take a Girl Like You

Jenny is a beauty and men and women are crazy about her, most of all handsome Patrick Standish, who Jenny also likes. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. She is an improbable but convincing blend of sexy good looks with solid domestic instincts, feminine gentleness with the toughness of the slums.

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Documented as a personal favorite of Kingsley Amis, Take a Girl Like You , originally published in , is peopled with subsidiary characters, ranging from the posh and pedantic to the proletarian and pessimistic. These characters, with names like Julian Ormerod or Dick Thompson, mildly stimulate most scenes with their eccentricity, such as at meals or an impromptu shooting competition. The reader is first introduced to the twenty-year-old Jenny Bunn, an old-fashioned working-class girl who recently moved to a small town near London to teach primary school children.

TAKE A GIRL LIKE YOU

Basket 0. I have for the first time found what I can truly love — I have found you. You are my sympathy — my better self — my good angel. I am bound to you with a strong attachment.

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King of Shaft: A Review of Take a Girl Like You by Kingsley Amis

An account of the writing — and reading, and other stuff — in my life by Andrew Cartmel. Post a Comment. Continuing my modestly ambitious project of reading all of Kingsley Amis's novels inspired by Zachary Leader's admirable and definitive biography of Amis , I have just finished Take a Girl Like You. I'd go along with that, though it isn't about to unseat The Green Man as my personal favourite. Actually, there is an interesting foreshadowing of The Green Man here.

TAKE A GIRL LIKE YOU. by Kingsley Amis ‧ RELEASE DATE: Feb. 22, Young Jenny Bunn comes to infant-teach outside of London and is quite.

The narrative follows the progress of twenty-year-old Jenny Bunn, who has moved from her family home in the North of England to a small town not far from London to teach primary school children. Jenny is a 'traditional' Northern working-class girl whose dusky beauty strikes people as being at odds with the old-fashioned values she has gained from her upbringing, not least the conviction of 'no sex before marriage'. A thread of the novel concerns the frustrations of the morally dubious Patrick Standish, a year-old teacher at a local private secondary school and his attempts to seduce Jenny; all this occurs against a backdrop of Jenny's new teaching job, Patrick's work and his leisure time with flatmate and colleague Graham and their new acquaintance, the well-off and somewhat older man-about-town, Julian Ormerod. The novel opens with Jenny Bunn's arrival at her lodging-house.

This perceptive coming of age novel about a northern girl who moves south, wants to fit in and yet wants to preserve her principles, challenges our assumptions about the battle of the sexes and classes in Britain. It is a story about 'the squalid business of the man and the woman' and 'the most wonderful thing that had ever happened' to Jenny Bunn. Few twentieth century novelists have explored our preoccupation with sex like Kingsley Amis.

Higher Education. Jenny is a beauty and men and women are crazy about her, most of all handsome Patrick Standish, who Jenny also likes. Get the latest news on all things Higher Education. Learn about our books, authors, teacher events, and more!

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Comments: 1
  1. Najin

    Between us speaking, I would arrive differently.

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