Site Logo
Looking for girlfriend > 50 years > How do you handle a girl like maria

How do you handle a girl like maria

I used to say my favourite colour was black to be cool, but it is pink — all shades of pink. If I have an accessory, it is probably pink. I once live-tweeted the September issue. In these funny and insightful essays, Roxane Gay takes us through the journey of her evolution as a woman Sweet Valley High of colour The Help while also taking readers on a ride through culture of the last few years Girls , Django in Chains and commenting on the state of feminism today abortion, Chris Brown.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: How Do You Solve a Problem Like Maria.

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Maria from The Sound of Music

How Do You Solve A Problem Like Maria lyrics

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service.

It only takes a minute to sign up. The nuns in the movie "The Sound of Music" are singing about Maria, who is difficult to deal with:. Being non-native and only seeing a still frame of the scene I thought it meant "How does Maria solve problems? Somewhat similar to "What would Jesus do? The phrase "like Maria" can modify either a preceding noun phrase "a problem" or a preceding verb phrase "solve a problem".

Both of these usages are recognized as valid by traditional prescriptive grammars Fowler describes "He talks like an expert" as an "unexceptionable" usage of like, where " like is equivalent to a prepositional adverb"—p. Prescriptive grammars have traditionally condemned a third use of like, the use "as a conjunction" where it is followed by a clause e.

However, as the comments point out, that construction would allow you to express "How do you solve problems the way that Maria solves problems" without ambiguity. Many modern linguists analyze like as a preposition when it takes a bare noun phrase like "Maria" as its complement although like is not always a preposition, and even when it is, it doesn't always behave exactly the same way as other prepositions.

The same kind of ambiguity is seen with many prepositional phrases, as illustrated by the joke "One morning, I shot an elephant in my pajamas.

How he got in my pajamas, I don't know," which relies on this ambiguity. While the sentence in isolation can be interpreted that way, if you actually listen to the whole song, as well as the dialogue surrounding it, you would understand that Mother Superior considers Maria to be a problem, not a problem solver.

So it wouldn't make sense for her to ask how Maria would solve problems. Given the overall context, it's clear that the question means "How do you solve the problem of an impertinent nun, such as Maria. Implicitly, "Global Warming" is a problem, and the question is then "how would we solve a problem like that one? The rest of the song goes on to list a series of intractable problems, such as how to pin down a moonbeam.

This implies that "Maria" is like an intractable problem that has no solution. Both meanings are valid. To "solve a problem like" generally means, "how to solve a problem in the same category of. On the other hand, "How would you solve a problem like Steve?

One of the terrible things about English, and also one of the most wonderful, is that it can be incredibly ambiguous. A popular example is the proverb " Time flies like an arrow. For instance, which word in that sentence is the verb? The sentence is grammatically equivalent to " Fruit flies like a banana. Most people of course would see the obvious and intended meaning, but some of us like to notice the inappropriate, but grammatically correct interpretations.

For further discussion, see: Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana - Wikipedia. This is indeed an ambiguous sentence. You can disambiguate either meaning: "How do you solve a problem like Maria does?

The direct answer to your question "Can "solve a problem like [someone]" also be understood in this way? And not only in poetic useage such as a song lyric. Consider George, a software engineer with a particular talent for problem-solving, but with unfortunate personal habits - to put it bluntly, he stinks.

But George is a problem in the workplace. We want his skills, but no-one wants to work in the same room. And there are others like him. The boss thinks "I wish I could solve a problem like George is ". Both useages are correct and current. Occasionally, as in the above contrived example, there can be ambiguity. In which case it behoves the writer to use a different construction. But not, I think, in "How do you solve a problem like Maria?

I believe it is important to keep in mind that the sentence in question is part of a song. Music, like poetry, is an art form that requires interpretation. Taking a single sentence from a song and trying to interpret it strictly on the basis of English language rules is bound to add confusion, especially for a non-native speaker. Furthermore, this is a song from a musical , and that particular genre of theatre and film absolutely relies on the synergistic combination of music, lyrics, script, scene, and acting to fully convey its message.

Consider the song "People Will Say We're in Love", from another musical production from the same era, called Oklahoma! The lyrics ask, "why do people think we are in love? Taken out of context, the lyrics mostly imply that these two people do not like each other, yet there are some phrases that imply the opposite. For example, she calls him, "Sweetheart" just after telling him to return some personal possessions of hers.

And he says, "Your hand feels so grand in mine" just after admonishing her, "Don't keep your hand in mine. Watch how she looks at him with passion or how he holds her hand while singing those lyrics, and the meaning of the words is completely different. Much like real life, one might say. The lyrics alone also do not readily show that the song is a duet, which adds a great deal of context to the words. In the spoken script, just preceding the song, the male and female leads are having a conversation about an upcoming picnic, which the woman plans to attend with someone else.

The man wants her to attend the picnic with him, and she says it will cause people to "talk" gossip. They begin to discuss how folks love to gossip and, in the style of a musical, this conversation morphs into a song. Much more about their true relationship is implied by their flirtatious acting during the song than the lyrics themselves provide. By the end of the song, they are holding hands, smiling, and cheek-to-cheek, while the male lead sings, "Don't dance all night with me People will say we're in love.

And that is exactly the point. The Sound of Music is a film and theatre production of the same era and genre as Oklahoma! In order to fully understand the song lyrics, you must also understand the full context of the scene with Maria and the nuns, including what has happened just before the song begins. We already know that Maria is out in the hills enjoying nature and singing, of course! The nuns are quietly discussing the new "recruits" and the subject of Maria comes up.

They talk about her lack of discipline and yet she is also likable. At the end, Maria herself comes running into the abbey, hair a mess, late for prayer again, and stops short in front of the sisters who stop singing.

She tidies herself and tries to walk away with decorum, then the nuns resume singing the final "impossible problem" line: "how do you hold a moonbeam in your hand? The entire scene must be taken together, along with prior scenes which establish that Maria herself IS the problem that the nuns do not know how to solve. It is certainly not standard English to write or speak the way this sentence is written, but in a musical for stage or film, the rules do not always apply.

In fact, it is in large part, the breaking of rules -- like solemn nuns randomly breaking into song -- that makes the musical theatre genre so unique and engaging.

Sign up to join this community. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top. Home Questions Tags Users Unanswered.

Asked 9 months ago. Active 9 months ago. Viewed 6k times. Christian Macht. Christian Macht Christian Macht 2 2 silver badges 7 7 bronze badges. Where is the problem? So, "How do you solve a problem like Maria does? It's very contextual.

Consider, "How would you bake a cake like Maria? FWIW, I assumed the "like Maria would" meaning when seeing the subject line, but thought it would be fun to consider that Maria is like the problem - it turned out that was backwards compared to the intended reading.

But I've never seen the film. It's clearly implied from context that Maria is the problem, but the language is ambiguous. I had the same problem with a line from the song She's a Maniac : " And she's dancing like she's never danced before.

Sometimes you have to read the context to understand what's intended. Nobody is discussing intonation. Although not a full answer by itself, it is especially important outside of song. Music often ignores or significantly changes tonal emphasis, delays and accents. Using the example from the previous comment, if pauses are placed between words and the voice raised with exclamation at the end of " Tonal changes can still confuse non-native speakers.

Active Oldest Votes. You're right: "How do you solve a problem like Maria? Context is key, but would you consider the popularity of this musical to have coined an idiom of it? Compare it to the line, "How do you hold a moonbeam in your hand? You can't, Maria can't, and Maria is a problem that cannot be solved or moreover solve for herself. Hypothetical arguments in The Sound of Music [ english. See also my comment at OP. JanusBahsJacquet Your first examples of "like" as an adjective strikes me as archaic and I'm 61 - BrE , the second is old-fashioned and I think only applies to the phrase "like as not".

Maria lyrics - the Nuns

This song is sung by the nuns at Nonnberg Abbey , who are exasperated with Maria for being too frivolous and frolicsome for the decorous and austere life at the Abbey. When Oscar Hammerstein II wrote the lyric for this song, he followed the lead from a line in the dialogue that Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse wrote in their script, describing Maria's flighty ways in the Abbey. In particular, he was taken by the detail of her wearing curlers in her hair under her wimple. He admitted that his vocabulary was never big, [3] but the simple adjectives he used to describe Maria's character proved a success.

Account Options Sign in. Ver eBook.

She climbs a tree and scrapes her knee, her dress has got a tear She waltzes on her way to Mass and whistles on the stair And underneath her wimple she has curlers in her hair I even heard her singing in the abbey. She's always late for chapel, but her penitence is real She's always late for everything, except for every meal I hate to have to say it, but I very firmly feel Maria's not an asset to the abbey. How do you solve a problem like Maria? How do you catch a cloud and pin it down?

Sound Of Music - Maria (The Nuns) Lyrics

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. It only takes a minute to sign up. The nuns in the movie "The Sound of Music" are singing about Maria, who is difficult to deal with:. Being non-native and only seeing a still frame of the scene I thought it meant "How does Maria solve problems? Somewhat similar to "What would Jesus do? The phrase "like Maria" can modify either a preceding noun phrase "a problem" or a preceding verb phrase "solve a problem". Both of these usages are recognized as valid by traditional prescriptive grammars Fowler describes "He talks like an expert" as an "unexceptionable" usage of like, where " like is equivalent to a prepositional adverb"—p. Prescriptive grammars have traditionally condemned a third use of like, the use "as a conjunction" where it is followed by a clause e.

Maria (Rodgers and Hammerstein song)

She climbs a tree and scrapes her knee Her dress has got a tear She waltzes on her way to Mass And whistles on the stair And underneath her wimple She has curlers in her hair I even heard her singing in the abbey. She's always late for chapel But her penitence is real She's always late for everything Except for every meal I hate to have to say it But I very firmly feel Maria's not an asset to the abbey. How do you solve a problem like Maria? How do you catch a cloud and pin it down? How do you find a word that means Maria?

.

.

.

.

.

She's a girl! How do you solve a problem like Maria? How do you catch a cloud and pin it down? How do you find a word that.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Comments: 1
  1. Takazahn

    Bravo, very good idea

Thanks! Your comment will appear after verification.
Add a comment

© 2020 Online - Advisor on specific issues.